Quiet Worship…Quiet Adds to the Worship Experience

QuietChurch focuses worship in collective quiet…worshippers gathering and seeking a spiritual encounter in the Reverent Quiet.

I, unfortunately, sometimes describe QuietChurch by emphasizing the comparative absences such as:

  • no sermon,
  • no preaching,
  • no hymns or music performances,
  • no amplifiers,
  • no slide shows,
  • no disruptions, or
  • no awkward slap-the-back-and-pump-the-palm greeting time.

Yet, I do QuietChurch an injustice by focusing on what is apparently “not there” when describing a QuietChurch worship experience.

Quiet Profoundly Adds to Worship

Quiet and silence (Reverent Quiet) add to a worship experience. Perhaps especially to those who don’t-like-church or who find the rote motions of church wanting, Reverent Quiet might fill-in that which is missing, for some, in other worship modes.

Quiet and Silence Are Important Things In Themselves

Quiet and silence are things in themselves. And important things. Quiet and silence add to our environment and add to worship because quiet and silence are of God. For example, see Revelation 8:1 (silence in Heaven upon opening of the 7th Seal) or the quintessential, 1 Kings 19:11-14 (God speaks in the whisper after the clamor).

Quiet and Silence Not Absence but Presence

The point here is that quiet and silence are not the absence of something, as sometimes viewed secularly (and even that is inaccurate), but the presence of something—and something of ultimate importance, God.

When accurately viewed as adding-to worship, QuietChurch takes on a new importance. Certainly, QuietChurch does not entirely replace other forms of worship, and I do not assert that QuietChurch is better-than other forms of worship. Neither is necessarily accurate or Biblically supported.

But I do assert that omitting quiet and silence as worship opportunities removes something vital from our spiritual sanctuaries and from our worship experiences—and perhaps the omission even removes a part of each of us from God.